2017, 2016 and 2015 Earned Income Tax Credit (EIC) Qualification Income Limits

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[Updated] Below are the final IRS published 2016 and 2017 Earned Income Tax credit (EITC) figures. You can reference IRS publication 596 or use online tax providers like TurboTax or H&R Block to get a free estimate of the specific credit amount you would get.


How to read the EITC tables: The maximum earned income credit allowed/payable for the given tax year is shown in line 1. To start claiming this credit you must have at least $1 of earned income, with line 2 showing the minimum amount of earned income required to get the maximum earned income tax credit.

The amount of credit you receive or qualify for varies based on income and number of children so will differ from person to person. Earned income includes all the taxable income such as Wages, salaries, and tips, certain disability benefits and self-employment earnings.

The “Phaseout Threshold Amount Begins“ (lines 3 and 5 depending on filing status) and “Phaseout Amount When Credit Ends” (lines 4 and 6 depending on filing status) are the adjusted gross income (AGI) ranges from where the EITC begins to phase out to where it reaches $0, or the income at or above which no credit is allowed.

Or said another way you need to earn between $1 and the amounts in line 4 or 6 (based on filing statues) to get at least some of the EIC. If your income is between lines 3 and 4 (single filer) or lines 5 and 6 (married) then you get the FULL EIC for the year.

Calculate and Claim your EITC refund amount with: TurboTax, H&R Block, Tax Act or E-file

2017 Earned Income Tax Credit (for Returns Filed in 2018)

Income Qualification ItemNo ChildrenWith 1 ChildWith 2 ChildrenWith 3+ Children
1. Max. 2017 Earned Income Tax Credit Amount$510$3,400$5,616$6,318
2. Earned Income (lower limit) required to get maximum credit $6,670$10,000$14,040$14,040
3. Phaseout Threshold Amount Begins
(for Single, SS, or Head of Household)
$8,340$18,340$18,340$18,340
4. Phaseout Amount When Credit Ends
(for Single, SS, or Head of Household)
$15,010$39,617$45,007$48,340
5. Phaseout Threshold Amount Begins
(for Married Filing Jointly)
$13,930$23,930$23,930$23,930
6. Phaseout Amount When Credit Ends
(for Married Filing Jointly)
$20,600$45,207$50,597$53,930
Check out the  latest online tax software deals for filing your return and claiming this credit.

2016 Earned Income Tax Credit (For Returns Filed in 2017)

Income Qualification ItemNo ChildrenWith 1 ChildWith 2 ChildrenWith 3+ Children
1. Maximum 2016 Earned Income Tax Credit Amount$506$3,373$5,572$6,269
2. Earned Income (lower limit) required to get maximum credit $6,610$9,920 $13,930 $13,930
3. Phaseout Threshold Amount Begins
(for Single, SS, or Head of Household)
$8,270$18,190 $18,190 $18,190
4. Phaseout Amount When Credit Ends
(for Single, SS, or Head of Household)
$14,880$39,296$44,648$47,955
5. Threshold Phaseout Amount Begins
(for Married Filing Jointly)
$13,820$23,740$23,740$23,740
6. Phaseout Amount When Credit Ends
(for Married Filing Jointly)
$20,430$44,846$50,198$53,505

2015 Earned Income Tax Credit (For Returns Filed in 2016)

Income Qualification ItemNo ChildrenWith 1 ChildWith 2 ChildrenWith 3+ Children
1. Maximum 2015 Earned Income Tax Credit Amount$503$3,359$5,548$6,242
2. Earned Income (lower limit) required to get maximum credit $6,580$9,880 $13,870 $13,870
3. Phaseout Threshold Amount Begins
(for Single, SS, or Head of Household)
$8,240$18,110 $18,110$18,110
4. Phaseout Amount When Credit Ends
(for Single, SS, or Head of Household)
$14,820$39,131$44,454$47,747
5. Threshold Phaseout Amount Begins
(for Married Filing Jointly)
$13,760$23,630$23,630$23,630
6. Phaseout Amount When Credit Ends
(for Married Filing Jointly)
$20,340$44,651$49,974$53,267

Example on figuring the EITC: Your AGI is $46,000, you are single, and you have two qualifying children. You cannot claim the EITC because your AGI is not less than the completed (maximum) phase out limit of $44,454. However, if your filing status was married filing jointly, you would be able to claim some of the EITC because your AGI is less than $49,974 complete phase out limit. However, you cannot get the full EITC because your income is above the $23,630 threshold phase amount. Further scenarios are shown below:

Scenario 1: Andrea has an earned income of $1,200 for the year – Andrea would be entitled to a partial credit since she her earned income is less than the “Earned Income (lower limit) required to get maximum credit” per line 2. The amount of credit would vary based on the number of qualifying children. You can reference IRS publication 596 or use online tax providers like TurboTax or H&R Block to get a free estimate of the specific credit amount you would get

Scenario 2:  Rachelle has 1 child and an earned income of 15,000 for the year – Rachelle is entitled to the full EIC credit for a single filer with 2 children since her earned income is above the “Earned Income (lower limit) required to get the maximum credit” on line 2 but below the “Phaseout Threshold Amount Begins” on line 3.

Scenario 3:  Joe and Mary have an earned income of $45,000 and 2 children – Joe and Mary would be entitled to a partial EIC credit for a married couple with 2 children since their earned income is above the “Threshold Phaseout Amount Begins” on line 5 but below the “Phaseout Amount When Credit Ends” on line 6. If your situation is similar reference IRS publication 596 or use online tax providers like TurboTax or H&R Block to get a free estimate of the specific credit amount you would be entitled to.

Scenario 4: Craig and Lina have earned income of $120,000 for the year – They would not be entitled to the credit at all since their earned income is above the “Phaseout Amount When Credit Ends” on line 6

Scenario 5 : Sandy made a little over 9500 for the year and has 3 dependents.  Does she get any of the EIC? To quality for the EITC you need to make just $1 of earned income. The lower and upper end of the income ranges are what matter more for the amount of credit you get. So based on the 2016 EITC table (for 2017 tax filing) and assuming you are married/filing a joint return with 3 deps/children, the max you can make to get any part of the ETIC is $53,505. Incomes between $13,930 and $23,740 get the full EITC ($6,269), but is lower (phases out) between $1 and $13,930 and between $23,740 and $53,505. Since you income is between $1 and $23,740 you would be eligible for a partial credit. You can use any tax filing software to get an exact estimate base on your other tax items.

Also in 2015, the earned income tax credit cannot be claimed if the aggregate amount of certain investment income exceeds $3,400.

Further, you have to file a tax return with the IRS to claim the EITC, even if you owe no tax or are not required to file. You can get help with figuring the EIC by following  instructions in IRS publication 596 or use online tax filing software which can also help you work through figuring your credit eligibility and determine the amount you would receive.


You may also qualify for the Child tax credit in addition to the EIC. See 7 Requirements for the Child Tax Credit

{ 159 comments… read them below or add one }

Darren Brown March 24

Can I file for 2013 2014 2015 I am disabled since October 2015

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Bridget Butler March 11

I am married, made 70,000 and my husband made 55,000. We have 2 dependants with a 3rd born at the end of 2016. Am i able to file HOH? And either way, would we or I qualify for eic? If I have to file married, it would be filed separetly.

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Mark February 12

Im claiming single head of house hold with 2 dependents.. I made 42063.12 last year.. Will i may the cut for EIC??

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Mark February 12

Will i get any EIC.. Im claiming single head of house hold with 2 dependents .. I earned 42063.12

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Whitney February 9

I am Single with No Children. I Made 48,000 this Year do I Qualify ?

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cmm1929 February 9

no

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Trista February 9

Apparently not. I’m the same as you but earned $10k less and I don’t qualify.

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Mexican 101 February 5

Anyone know

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Mexican 101 February 5

I didn’t do my taxes for 2015 cause I make just under 6k if I amend them and do them with this years reTurn. Would I be eligible to receive the 2015s earned incothecredit? Anyone know this

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cmm1929 February 9

yes, if you file a 2015 return now you would be eligible

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Ehco redensky January 26

I only made 3,100 in unemployment and 500 in my employment and have children to claim, will I be able to get EIC and child credit tax?

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Amanda January 24

So I was wondering…the 7 guidelines to claim a child…have they been the same over the past 5yrs or have they changed?

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Andy (Author) January 25

The income thresholds change…but the credit and guidelines have stayed pretty static for the last few years.

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Cheryl Hart January 24

I am single and made $21000. Would I be able to claim. EITC?

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Andy (Author) January 24

No…your income is above the maximum limit for single filers in 2016 ($20,430).

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Help January 20

I made 42364.97 and I’m a single mother and files HH… Would I still receive EIC? I’m kind of worried I will have to pay in….

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Andy (Author) January 24

You may if you have more than 2 dependents

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Jasmine Love January 15

I made a little over a $1,000 and im single with no dependents. But im head of household. Is it worth me filing? And if so how much would i get back?

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jjpni January 12

I have 1child and made 23,495

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Renee January 12

I made 18,000 single head of houshole 2 kids what would i get back

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Andy (Author) January 12

Assuming 18K is your full AGI for the year, you should get the full EIC credit as your income is between the lower and upper income threshold ranges.

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Sandy January 11

I’m confused even though it was some what explained. I made a little over 9500 for the year. I have 3 dependants. From what I can understand do I not get EIC because I didn’t make enough for the minimum?

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Andy (Author) January 12

To quality for the EITC you need to make just $1 of earned income. The lower and upper end of the income ranges are what matter more for the amount of credit you get. So based on the 2016 EITC table (for 2017 tax filing) and assuming you are married/filing a joint return with 3 deps/children, the max you can make to get any part of the ETIC is $53,505. Incomes between $13,930 and $23,740 get the full EITC ($6,269), but is lower (phases out) between $1 and $13,930 and between $23,740 and $53,505. Since you income is between $1 and $23,740 you would be eligible for a partial credit. You can use any tax filing software (free) to get an exact estimate base on your other tax items.

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rene January 7

self employed so could i file

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Andy (Author) January 12

Yes if you pay yourself wages, you can file.

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Katherine January 1

I’m a single mom with two kids and only made $1,000 this year and will be filing head of household. Do I still get the child tax credit or not?

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Michael October 16

If someone could please answer both of these questions, or even just one

1) If someone has a dependent child under 24 in college, but the child lives in a dorm or somewhere other than the claimants’ residence, can the child be claimed as “qualifying child” for EITC? On the one hand I would think the child fails the residency requirement by living out of the house more than half of the year, but such students often continue to put down their parents’ address as their “permanent address” and I noticed one of the 1040A forms for claiming a qualifying child says “Count time that you or your child is away from home on a temporary absence due to a special
circumstance as time the child lived with you”, and “school attendance” is listed as a special circumstance. Does it matter if the child was a student the whole year or finished school that tax year?

2) If absence due to school attendance counts as a “special circumstance”, how long has it been this way? This is for some research on the effects of EITC.

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cmm1929 February 9

A student living away at college is still considered to be a dependent living in your home, if the child graduated during the tax year it would depend on whether or not you provided over half the support

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Katrina Shorten February 23

I made 52000.00 this year before taxes. I own my own business. I am single with three dependents. Will I qualify?

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Jessica December 12

No the phase out threshold ends at 48,000 for single or head of household

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melanie arizmendi February 19

I’m married with 2 kids my husband not legal he have a tin # do we get income credit or should I file separate to get the credit for my kids

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laciennega alvarado March 9

If your married then you should file together, especially if he will ever want to become a resident. Immigration will want all your tax forms and returns before they will approve anything

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Chris May 20

If your legally married would be fraud to file any way but jointly.

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cmm1929 February 9

it is legal to file married and separately

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Rhonda Ibarra January 14

If you are married but have been separated I believe their is a release form the spouse can sign giving permission for other to claim…. I believe the separation would have had to have been for the full year not sure if your circumstances I cant remember the name of the form you will need to do some reasearch. I was able to use this but many years ago.

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Michelle Heald March 8

If married you can absolutely file the staus married filing separate. The separate does not mean that you and your spouse were seperated, ot simply means you are married yet choosing to file seperate tax returns. Filed this way for many, many years. It has nothing to do with being physically seperated.

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Sylvia February 19

I earned 4200 last year I file a 1099 do I get a credit

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Liz February 4

I am a single mom if one child I made 40k but with my 401k it brought my taxable wages down to 38,500. Will I quailify at all? Or do they look at what I made after my 401k? Which looks like they will give me something?

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Jennifer January 13

It goes by your taxable income

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wendy February 2

My husband and I have made 48,000 to 50,000 with approx 2,000 coming from unemployment. we have 4 dependants, would we be eligible.

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Lana February 1

I am 35 and receive SSI benefits. I pay all the bills and for the last 1 1/2 years I have been taking care of my boyfriends daughter financially. I received about 8,796 dollars last yr. Do I qualify for the EIC

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parriz February 2

if the father isn’t filing than u can if u meet these requirements: the daughter has to have lived in ur home all of last year, u provided more than 50% support and u have income

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cmm1929 February 9

you must have earned income from wages, SSI does not qualify

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joan hughes January 30

If I am a senior on ss and disabled and earned 1200.00 last year plus 8900.00 ss can i receive any eic

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parriz February 2

no. sorry.

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Patricia January 30

Don’t understand lower income bracket could someone explain it to me? I only made 6000 last year.

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Raekenya Wright January 28

Do I qualify for eic filing head of household with a 11 year old child in the state of Mississippi. Making roughly 26,ooo a year .

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parriz February 2

yes u qualify for the eic but u r in between the phaseout threshold, u should also get child tax credit, good luck!!!

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Jennifer January 13

Last year the credit was around 2100 for that wage range. Plus, you should also qualify for the child tax credit.

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Jessica January 28

So we have 4 kids and filling joint. Made 48,400. How much child tax credit should we expect?

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parriz February 2

not knowing other factors, maybe about 5000 w/the additional child tax credits. good luck!!!!

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Corey January 27

I made 7432.08 this year do I qualify for max credit with 3 children

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parriz February 2

no not enough income, sorry.

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Ashley January 27

I made roughly 12,400 claiming 3 dependents and head of household, what is my expected return? Also I became a homeowner this year does that factor in?

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parriz February 2

Ashley u may get about 4500, Good Luck!!!

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parriz February 2

also home ownership doesn’t have anything to do w/ the earn income credit. and if federal withholding was deducted u will get that back too.

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bobby January 26

I made 15600 single 2 kids but got a 1099 and I eligible eic

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parriz February 2

bobby yes u r eligible but I hope ur 1099 is less than 3000 to get the max. good luck!!!

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kiesha January 25

OK question, I’m filing single head of household with 2 children . Filing on a 1099 and on one I made almost 10,000 also have another from a previous employer for about 10,000 est on how much I would get back and should I just file one of the w2’s?? Would I be better off that way??

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parriz February 2

u r suppose to file all ur w2 and 1099 misc which u stated both would make ur income @ 20,000 u may only be eligible for 2500, Good Luck!!!

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Leeann January 24

I am a single parent of 2 kids 17 and 19 im claiming head of household and I made 16,444 where does that put me?. This chart is confusing to me. Would appreciate any replies Thank you

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Andy (Author) January 24

You should qualify for the full credit for 2015. See the column (2015 table) for 2 kids. Min amount needed to get the full credit is $13,870. The phase out limit start ($18,110) is when your credit will start reducing. But since you make below this you get the full credit

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Maggie January 23

My husband and I made approximately 60,000 for the year with two kids,would we qualify for eic??

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Andy (Author) January 24

Unfortunately no. For someone with 2 kids the top end income is $44,454 to receive any portion of the credit

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HC January 26

Actually, the top end income for a married couple with two kids is ~50k. If 60k is your gross income, then it is possible you will still qualify if your AGI is below the top limit. Complete the forms and see what they say; health insurance premiums and FSA accounts can easily get you below the threshold.

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phyllis francis January 20

Hi I worked only a few days & they took out $74 bucks but $0 in federal. I have a 3month old & a 6yr old will I qualify for the eic? I also use self employment on the side for doing hair. My ago for last year was 9 thousand

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parriz February 2

u made 9000 last year and u have self employment, yes u qualify for the eic. good luck!!!

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Makeva faust January 8

If I made 24,000 roughly came I get the max eic with 2 dependents…

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Andy (Author) January 25

Nope. The credit starts phasing out at $18,110…so you likely won’t get the full credit.

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TREVOR January 8

Last year i did qualify for the tax benefit. However my question is i didnt know about it unttil after i filed my normal tax info i recived a notice in mail. And did another file for credit. Can i file my normal tax form and my tax break on one form. Or separate? I only get 8 hrs a week its all leget i get pay stubbs but its all to go towads my room and board. Taxs still get taking out. Just dont see any money. I get ssi to live with. What do u recommend

TREVOR

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Paula K Millet January 6

I’m on long term disability-threw the Insurance Company that I paid into(same place I got hurt.) waiting for my day in court for my SSI.Every year(I barely make it from month to month.) I end up paying every year.I have no extra money at the end of the month-Morgage payments/and no dependents.What am I going to do-I get $16000.00 a year and end up paying. What am I doing wrong?! Can’t make it by.

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Courtney Robb January 5

Okay, I am confused I believe. This is our situation. We are married file jointly. I have no income. However, my husband made around $52,000 in 2015 and we have 5 dependents. How much refund should we get in 2016.

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parriz February 2

u only get eic for three kids but u should get the child tax credit and the additional child tax credit but u r close to the phase out limit u may get 2300 plus the other credits

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Sharon January 3

I didn’t work at all this year because I was pregnant but I was married in July and our child was born Aug so my husband is wanting to claim us both…will he qualify for eic

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alexis January 6

Yes he can claim your child as a dependent but since uve been married he will just file married n fill in u didnt make money n he will get earned income as long as hos AGI follows the chart above if u dnt understand chart i explained it if u scroll down in a comment.

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Shay jones December 30

So if I made like $8 thousand and something I have 2 dependents would I quality for the full amount or would I only get half of that

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Dee January 16

Shay, unfortunately, you don’t qualify for any credit. I am not sure what braniacs came up with this horrible formula. Smdh

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cm January 16

You should be able to get partial since you are below the amount of earned income to get full credit.

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alexis December 29

For those who dont understand chart (it is a lil difficult at first)
LINE 1= MAX credit you can receive for earned income
LINE 2=MINIMUM amount of AGI (GROSS INCOME fOR YEAR) to obtain the max payout from line 1
LINE 3 N UP= MAXIMUM You can make the year to obtain amount above

So basically follow to number of kids then line to u need to make atleast that much n no more than line 3 n up.

LINE 3 AND UP is how you will file whether married single or seperate.
Hope this helps

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Shyrell December 29

Hi ,
I’m a single mother of one and made around $44,000 (guesstimating). Do I qualify for the eitc? I also had some difficulty understanding the new table.

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Andy (Author) January 25

Unfortunately no. For someone with 1 kid the top end income is $39,296 to receive any portion of the credit which you look to be above.

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KMR December 28

I have 3 dependants and made almost 9,000 in 6 months how much eic will i possibly receive or even get back

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Rochelle December 25

So I’m a single mother of 2 i only worked half of the year 2015 averaging $7,000. Would I qualify for a full earned income credit and what about an unearned income credit?

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alexis December 29

As of chart above no because you didnt make the minimum amount $13,XXX but you can claim side jobs such as baby sitting..yard work ect. To make your AGI higher to get maximum return. If not you will still get money back it just wont be the highest. N even thoufg you didnt pay taxes on side work it will still be in your favor. :)

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RkG December 24

QUESTION?
Hello,

I’m a single, unemployed mother of four.
However, I am a current college student and received my first 2015 financial aid reward return. I also receive monthly SSI pymnts for two of my children.

My eldest son is twenty years old, has been employed for the past nine months, and one of my children of whom SSI is being received for. He is currently the only one with an earned income aiding over 50% of support towards my household expenses, also assisting with the personal care needs for the family, as my younger three children are twelve, thirteen and fourteen year old minors. My fourteen year old being autistic, and the second to receive SSI benefits.

I’d like to know if it would be against the law or IRS policy for my eldest son to proceed with filing his first tax, utilizing everyone (all three minors) in the house including head of house if his Total Gross YTD amount earned income is $13,977.28?

Would I be able to file separate taxes on the SSI amounts received along with the financial reward obtained from college?
Excluding head of house.

Please advise, your response is most appreciated.

Thank you kindly…

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alexis December 29

You may file seperately as well as your son may claim siblings on his taxes as dependents if he paid more than half of their expenses.
but… as for the SSI it would have to be on tax filing with the children receiving it. But i know as far as seperated parents being an example both parents can claim a child for dependents although only 1 will recieve earned income. Im not a professional but i wanted to help u have a better idea of your choices as well as maybe its better for u to claim 1 or 2 children and the oldest son to claim the other 2 or 3. Id suggest turbo tax where u can do it yourself plug in information and test it out doing trial and error where you may see where it will bemefit your family the most. Also just another thing is children can claim parents if they paid more than half there way as well. I hope i helped i know i didnt have total solution but i said what i know.

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Sheila September 4

You would not get the EITC for SSI because it is not earned income. So unless you have some earnings from work, than your son should claim the 3 dependent sit he provides over 1/2 of their support.

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Sheila September 4

You would not qualify for the EITC for the SSI because it is Not earned income, so unless you have earnings from work than your son should claim his siblings if he is in fact providing over 50 % of their support.

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Kasie December 24

I made right around 3000 with 3 dependents claimed 0 on w-4s will i qualify for eic and child tax credit? I cant understand chart

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brittany December 22

If my income before taxes is 56k I have 4 children- also married filing separate about how much would u figure I’d qualify for?

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Tyroyonna December 20

Im 17 in college and work. Can i file tax and still let my farther carry me?

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Angie December 21

Yes, u can still file. However, u should file as dependent and not independent. Answer the question on ur 1040ez as YES. Can someone else claim u on their income tax? This will change u to dependent.

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lera December 4

My daughter will turn 17 on the 8th of December will her turning that age at the end if 2015 still qualify me for eitc when filing my 2015 tax

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April December 11

Yes u can still claim her. At least until age 18, or even 19 if she is still in high school.

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Bob December 11

Yes, so long as she lived with you more than half the year. Qualifying children are under 19, so you’ll be able to use it next year, too.

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Shonda December 2

I just got married but m husband is not working at all and we have 2 kids so will I be able to get Earn Income Credit and Head of Household

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Bob December 11

Martial status according to the IRS is determined by your status the last day of the year. So, if you got married on December 31st, you’re considered married the entire tax year.

Assuming your kids are minors, yes, you will be able to use the EIC, if you qualify for it. EIC is based on the tax year’s wages, and, if you file jointly, your wages as well. If your husband worked at all, that information will have to be included in your return.

EIC is phased out based on income.

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Andy (Author) December 13

Thanks for your replies Bob. Appreciate you helping some of the readers with their questions

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Anne November 27

I have 2 children and also collect disability how much can I earn without going over to receivemy best refund

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Bob December 11

If you can work, you’ll earn more after taxes than what you would get depending on the system to provide you with free cash.

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MonicaAguilar October 23

If I am Head of household and have 3 dependents one is 17 in school,how much is my maximum taxes for the yr 2015 before I go over??

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Bob December 11

Before EIC is completely phased out, around $47,000. The table is right above…

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tiffany September 27

If you have no income for the year but have a child who will be around a yr old when it’s tax season an your a single parent never married, d you qualify for earned income credit? Or is it a waist to file…

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Bob December 11

*waste, not waist.

If you have no income, are you a dependent? Will someone else claim you on their return? If so, have that person claim your child as well.

If not, EIC won’t help much if you have zero income.

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nancy September 19

I am 55 and single. My yearly income should be about 22,000 I live with my mother and help with her care do I quality for eic

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Bob December 11

No.

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mary December 27

Can you still receive EIC if your daughter is 24 years old and is still a dependent and live with you?

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Ago September 14

I made $17,000 this year and had $3,600 taken out of Taxes and I am a single 21 year old living with his father. What’s a rough estimate of how much I will get back? Can someone answer my question? Please and thank you!

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Bob December 11

Depends on your state and whether or not you have deductions and exemptions.

Based entirely on wage alone, it still depends on your state. Google “wage calculator” and estimate your year’s income and taxes taken out.

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Gary August 18

There’s a minor typo in the chart. For couples who file jointly and have no qualifying children, the maximum income for EIC is $20,330, not $20,340.

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Kimberly Smith August 8

I’m a single, with two children, I file head of household. My income should be about 22,000 this year(2015), will I qualify for earned income credit? I have in the past. This year I was unsure if they were even giving that credit out. Have plans. Thank you.

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ashley March 30

If you only made $250. Is it worth it to file? I have my 2 sons to claim also. I’m currently married but going through a divorce (seperated 5 years) , we are not filing together! Can I claim my disabled (paralyzed) boyfriend too?

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parriz February 2

Hi ashley in my opinion it is not worth it to file b/c u don’t have enough income, let someone u trust like mom, sis, bro claim ur 2 sons if they have income like $14000 so that they can get the maximum and share it w/u and the boyfriend b/c he’s disabled can be claimed alone w/the kids good luck!!! reply back if need to.

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rj March 1

I’m 21 years old and singleI currently live with my mother and my little sister helping them around the house and all those good things I’ve only made 2000 in 2014 I don’t understand the table at all which bracket would I fit in?

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liberty March 9

hey rj you would not would not qualified because you have to be 25 to get the credit or have qualifying dependent.

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kristen February 27

I have two children and was on unemployment would I qualify?

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michelle March 3

I was on unemployment for an entire year once and I did not get the EIC . I have two children. I was told that I had no Earned Income so therefore I did not qualify for any credit. I did not owe anything but I got nothing back that year

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parriz February 2

if u and the dad can come to an agreement about the funds u both win or let grandma claim them. good luck!!!

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latesha Jones February 23

I received a letter from the IRS stating that they adjusted my account to include EIC. It said I will receive my EIC refund within 6 weeks. What does that mean? The company I filed my taxes with told me that it was already included in my refund, and the letter I got was just delayed. But I received the letter 2 weeks after my refund.

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otisha March 1

I just received the same notice 2 weeks ago

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Lisa February 12

I have four different w2’s… (1)..126.27—.(2)..944.40—(3)..5501.96.—(4)..7061.17..with no kids not married…am i eligible for EITC?

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Andy (Author) February 12

Add them up and assuming you have no investment income it looks like you may qualify. You can still get the EITC with no kids per the table in the article

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Lindsey February 4

My fiancée and I filed together and we have a 2 year old daughter. Our income together was about 45,000. We didn’t get as much back as I thought we would because the person we filed with said we made too much to file her as eic! Is this true? I am thinking about having it amended and going somewhere else. I feel like we got screwed!

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David March 10

Lindsey,
If you are not married, you probably should not have filed a joint return – assuming that is what you filed.

Filing an amended return:
If you claimed your daughter and filed as head of household (HH), you would probably qualify for EIC and a greater refund of taxes. Your fiancee would have to file single so his refund may not be as great. Filing HH is generally the best filing status – lower tax rate, greater refunds.

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Kylie March 19

David, yes you are right in a sense. She could have gotten more back by having one of them file single and the other as head of household but some states allow you to file a joint return even when not married. What some fail to do is whether it is beneficial or not to file jointly. That being said, you really should ask Lindsey how much their income was combined! That’s the bottom line to answering as to why they didn’t get any eic.

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Ny December 8

Kylie, what a state allows is irrelevant when it comes to Federal Taxes. State rules are applicable to state taxes only. If you are not married. You are not legally qualified to file a joint return at the federal level.

Tasha V March 11

I’m not sure what you mean by filed together because since you weren’t legally married as of Dec. 31, 2014, you cannot file married filing jointly. If you did though, you would not qualify for EIC for one child because your income is over $43,940. You’re not considered very low income.

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carter123 February 4

I have 2 kids, made 15,000 last yr and am married but filing seperate, will I qualify for eic? and how does my husbands tax returns being held effect me since we’re seperated?

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Mike February 11

NO you will not qualify

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Kylie March 19

You don’t get any eic, child tax credit or the dependent tax credit if you file separately.

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Kylie March 19

Carter if you separated before June 30th, that allows one of you to file head of household with the children and the other to file single. Then you would qualify for eic. If you split after June 30th, go file your taxes together peacefully and ask them to split the refund and deposit it into two separate bank accounts so you guys can get the max benefit that you can and not lose out on your credits. Remember most of us use that refund for our children and that we should be peaceful around children so that they don’t know what’s going on and that you both love them . You guys could file injured spouse as well since you know he has money being held.

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saleen February 3

I work as a bartender making only $5 an hour + tips, there for I only paid in $1.20 to federal. I have one child, I net 2788.00 this year, am I eligible for the earned income credit? I am single, 24 years old, cannot file as head of house.

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Frankie S. February 3

OK I understand the table. My question for you sir regards write-offs. If I made 397 dollars more than the EIC cutoff and I write off gas, food, and expenditures used due to employment and they total more than that 397 dollars would that qualifye for the EIC. I’m filing single HH. Thanks in advance for your help.

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Kylie March 19

You are clearly itemizing and that deduction could help you get under the phase out, however make sure that you are doing it legally and not just writing in the expenses to get the credit!! They will red flag that and audit you! Once you know how much your itemized deductions are, take that away from your agi and see what that number is. Then go see where you qualify on the eic tables!

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Stephanie neamon February 1

How can I claim the child support I paid for, and where do I claim my significant other, Cuz I supported him for more than six months in 2014

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michelle March 3

You can not claim child support on your taxes (nor does other party have to report it…it sucks), alimony you can claim, but not child support. You can claim insurance paid, daycare, those types of expenses

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marilyn January 31

i made 42,000 last year. I have 2 dependents. Would i qualify for eic. if so would i get the max credit?

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Barbara September 20

My husband made 3,500.00 , got 5,700.00 unemployment and 30,000.00 in retirement…there 3 dependent total ..can we get earn income credit. ..

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Twana January 31

Me and my husband made 53000 last year. Will we get eic

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terry byrom January 31

I made 12,027.27 in 2015,with no dependents,how much will my earned income credit be? Thank you

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Toni January 30

I made $356 in December, and I have one child. Would I be able to recieve the eic? And if yes how much?

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nancy w January 30

I made 10,317 on my 1040 I lost my job and therefore had to take my 401 k it was 17,000 and 20% of that was held I receive a 1099 on on the 17,000 I have 3 children can I claim the earned income credit or is my 401 considered investment money

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Dee January 26

I’m the head of the household of a family of 5, and the only one working. I’ve had imputed income because my domestic partner has medical ins. Through my employee. With that, it grosses up my gross income so when I file taxes it won’t give me EIC because it looks like I make a lot. Does anyone else have this issue or know what other options to take when it comes to filing taxes?

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megan January 26

I only made about $17,000 and I have a child would I be able to get the EITC?

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Andy (Author) January 26

See the 2014 EIC table for this year’s filing. And yes it looks like at your income level you should qualify for the EITC.

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mt January 24

I made this year 42,000 and my wife 7,000. we had a foreclosure many years ago and the mortgage company was sued by the government and we were given 7500 in Jan 2014. It was a settlement for unfair practices which allowed us to buy a house again. Is that taxable? we used the money to renovate the house. If it is do we qualify for earned income. We have 2 kids and file jointly Thanks

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Sheryl January 21

Hi, i only work 3months period last year..my gross is only $6,745, do u think i am qualify for earned income credit?

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Alicia January 20

If my son was born in October of 2014, is he eligible for earned I come credit? I wasn’t sure about the “child must live with parents for 6 months of the year” rule..

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Angela silloway January 23

I only maid a little over 6,000 when I filed last year for 2 kids and I got back 3,200

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Lydia January 26

Yes, anyone who’s born until 12:00 midnight of December 31 2014 is eligible..

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Berhane G Hailemicael January 17

I,my wife and 14 years old daughter are a permanent resident of the USA as of 9/8/2014 living with my unmarried daughter. I and my wife are unemployed and our daughter is a high school student. Can she file her tax return as head of household including us as her dependents?

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Andy (Author) January 17

I don’t think so since she is still a minor. Why don’t you file and claim your wife and her as dependents?

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Really January 26

Really??? She’s in HIGH SCHOOL! Let her be a child! She is YOUR dependent. You should be taking care of HER.

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Lydia January 26

No, she can’t file her own taxes and definitely not file as head of household, unless she’s old enough and have a job that supports you and your wife and if she’s the one that pays more than 50% of your household expenses…

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ITs me February 1

Yes your unmarried daughter can file you, your wife and your 14 year old daughter. I think people misunderstood your question. As long as your daughter is an adult with a job she can claim you 3

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Hannah January 17

If the gross annual income of an individual is at the cusp of not qualifying for child credits will the deduction amt of filing status effect that negatively if the chose MFJ as opposed to MFS? This might be a silly question but I was hoping for some clarification on that topic…as in, does the larger deduction for mfj still play in the taxpayers favor for receiving the child credits by meeting the min income requirments?

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H Pham November 20

The article says “Also in 2015, the earned income tax credit cannot be claimed if the aggregate amount of certain investment income exceeds $3,450”. The correct amount is $3,400 not $3,450.

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Andy (Author) November 21

Thanks for the correction H Pham. I do appreciate when readers let me know of any errors. I have fixed it and confirmed against IRS procedure rp-14-61 which states, “Excessive Investment Income…the earned income tax credit is not allowed under §32(i) if the aggregate amount of certain investment income exceeds $3,400 [in 2015]”

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Debbie January 16

If I made 27000 with one child. Was wondering how much I would get on earned income credit

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