2017, 2016 and Past Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) Qualification and Income Thresholds

227 comments

[Update]  Below are the EITC tables for the past few years. These are adjusted annually in line with inflation and other government mandates. The EITC supplements the wages of low income workers, and especially working mothers, lifting more children out of poverty than any other single federal program. Over 9 million families are eligible for the EITC.


Note: For 2016 tax returns filed in 2017, see the second table covering the 2016 Earned Income Tax Credit.

How to read the EITC tables: The maximum earned income credit allowed/payable for the given tax year is shown in line 1. To start claiming this credit you must have at least $1 of earned income, with line 2 showing the minimum amount of earned income required to get the maximum earned income tax credit.

The amount of credit you receive or qualify for varies based on income and number of children so will differ from person to person. Earned income includes all the taxable income such as Wages, salaries, and tips, certain disability benefits and self-employment earnings.

The “Phaseout Threshold Amount Begins“ (lines 3 and 5 depending on filing status) and “Phaseout Amount When Credit Ends” (lines 4 and 6 depending on filing status) are the adjusted gross income (AGI) ranges from where the EITC begins to phase out to where it reaches $0, or the income at or above which no credit is allowed.

Or said another way you need to earn between $1 and the amounts in line 4 or 6 (based on filing status) to get at least some of the EIC. If your income is between lines 3 and 4 (single filer) or lines 5 and 6 (married) then you get the FULL EIC for the year.

2017 Earned Income Tax Credit (for Returns Filed in 2018)

Income Qualification ItemNo ChildrenWith 1 ChildWith 2 ChildrenWith 3+ Children
1. Max. 2017 Earned Income Tax Credit Amount$510$3,400$5,616$6,318
2. Earned Income (lower limit) required to get maximum credit $6,670$10,000$14,040$14,040
3. Phaseout Threshold Amount Begins
(for Single, SS, or Head of Household)
$8,340$18,340$18,340$18,340
4. Phaseout Amount When Credit Ends
(for Single, SS, or Head of Household)
$15,010$39,617$45,007$48,340
5. Phaseout Threshold Amount Begins
(for Married Filing Jointly)
$13,930$23,930$23,930$23,930
6. Phaseout Amount When Credit Ends
(for Married Filing Jointly)
$20,600$45,207$50,597$53,930

2016 Earned Income Tax Credit (For Returns Filed in 2017)

Income Qualification ItemNo ChildrenWith 1 ChildWith 2 ChildrenWith 3+ Children
1. Maximum 2016 Earned Income Tax Credit Amount$506$3,373$5,572$6,269
2. Earned Income (lower limit) required to get maximum credit $6,610$9,920 $13,930 $13,930
3. Phaseout Threshold Amount Begins
(for Single, SS, or Head of Household)
$8,270$18,190 $18,190 $18,190
4. Phaseout Amount When Credit Ends
(for Single, SS, or Head of Household)
$14,880$39,296$44,648$47,955
5. Threshold Phaseout Amount Begins
(for Married Filing Jointly)
$13,820$23,740$23,740$23,740
6. Phaseout Amount When Credit Ends
(for Married Filing Jointly)
$20,430$44,846$50,198$53,505

Note: For tax season 2016-2017 (see key dates), the IRS has announced that due to new tax laws enacted for addressing identity theft and fraud with tax filings, it cannot issue refunds before February 15, 2017  for tax returns that claim the EITC or the Additional Child Tax Credit (ACTC).  This will result in numerous tax filers seeing delayed refunds relative to the standard schedule.

Examples on figuring the EITC from the tables above: 

Scenario 1: Sara has an earned income of $1,200 for the year – Sara would be entitled to a partial credit since she her earned income is less than the “Earned Income required to get the maximum credit (lower limit)” per line 2. The minimum amount of earnings to get a partial credit is $1. The amount of credit would vary based on the number of qualifying children.

Scenario 2: Megan has 1 child and an earned income of 14,000 for the year – Megan is entitled to the full EIC credit for a single filer with 2 children since her earned income is above the “Earned Income required to get the maximum credit (lower limit” on line 2) but below the “Starting Threshold Phaseout Amount” on line 3.


Scenario 3:  Joe and Mary have an earned income of $45,000 and 2 children – Joe and Mary would be entitled to a partial EIC credit for a married couple with 2 children since their earned income is above the “Starting Threshold Phaseout Amount (Married Filing Jointly)” on line 5 but below the “Completed Phaseout Amount (Married Filing Jointly)” on line 6.

Scenario 4: Kobe and Lina have earned income of $120,000 for the year and 3 children – They would not be entitled to the credit at all since their earned income is above the “Completed Phaseout Amount (Married Filing Jointly)” on line 6

Scenario 5: Your AGI is $47,000, you are single, and you have two qualifying children. You cannot claim the EITC because your AGI is not less than the 2017 completed (maximum) phase out limit. However, if your filing status was married filing jointly, you would be able to claim some of the EITC because your AGI is less than the $50,597 complete phase out limit for 2017. You would however only cannot get a partial EITC because your income is above the $23,930 threshold phase amount for 2017.

See IRS publication 596 or use online tax providers like TurboTax or H&R Block to get a free estimate of the specific credit amount you would be entitled to.

Claiming the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) on your Tax Return

You have to file a tax return with the IRS to claim the EITC, even if you owe no tax or are not required to file. You can get help with figuring the EIC and other qualifying criteria by following  instructions in IRS publication 596 or using online tax filing software which can also help you work through figuring your credit eligibility and determine the amount you would receive.

Based on some reader comments, I also wanted to list some other key criteria in addition to the income qualification levels above, to claim or qualify for the EIC. These are also covered in past year updates provided below.

  • If you are married and claiming the EIC you and your spouse have to submit a joint tax filing, so status cannot be married filing separately. At least one spouse has to have earned income to qualify for the credit
  • The earned income tax credit cannot be claimed if the aggregate amount of certain investment income exceeds $3,450
  • If you live overseas and claim certain foreign earned income and exclusions (via form 2555 services ) you cannot claim the EIC
  • Your child is a qualifying child for the EIC credit if he/she meets these four tests specified by the IRS – Relationship, Age, Residency and Joint Return

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[2015 Update] See this article for 2015 and 2016 EITC limits

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[2013 Update] As part of the fiscal cliff deal, the expanded Earned Income Tax credit (EITC) and Child Tax Credit were extended for another five years to 2017. The EITC supplements the wages of low income workers, and especially working mothers, lifting more children out of poverty than any other single federal program. Over 6 million families are eligible for the EITC. This expanded EITC keeps the phaseout thresholds for married couples at or above existing levels for single filers. For 2013 the income and credit limits reflect a slight increase over 2012 levels as shown in the table below.

2013 EITC limits

2013 EITC limits (source : IRS.gov)

The “earned income amount” (line 1) is the amount of income (minimum limit) at or above which the maximum amount of the earned income credit (line 2) is allowed. The “threshold phaseout amount (lines 3 and 5 depending on filing status) and “completed phaseout amount” (lines 4 and 6 depending on filing status) are the adjusted gross income (AGI) ranges from where the EITC begins to phase out to where it reaches $0, or the income at or above which no credit is allowed. These ranges change depending on the filing status.  Investment income must also be $3,200 or less for 2013 to claim the credit.

2012 EITC income and credit limits are provided in the update below along with examples of how the EITC works.

Child Tax Credit

The child tax credit maximum for each eligible under-age-17 child will remain at $1,000 for 2013 and will help over 10 million lower income families with 18 million children. The fiscal cliff deal also contains provisions to make the 2013 Child Tax Credit available to more working families that previously could not benefit from it by raising income qualification thresholds (which are not indexed to inflation).

For 2012, the child tax credit starts phasing out (reducing) for those above a specified modified adjusted gross income (MAGI). For married taxpayers filing a joint return, the phase-out begins at $110,000. For married taxpayers filing a separate return, it begins at $55,000. For all other taxpayers, the phase-out begins at $75,000. The credit is reduced/phased-out by $50 for each $1,000 of income above the above threshold amounts.

In addition, the Child Tax Credit is generally limited by the amount of the income tax you owe as well as any alternative minimum tax (AMT) you owe. Other qualification details for the credit can be found in this article.

If this information is useful to you consider subscribing (free) via RSS or Email if you would like to receive future updates when available.

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[2012 update] The IRS has officially released 2012 tax details and here are the changes to the Earned Income and Child Tax Credits:

– The 2012 Earned Income Tax credit (EITC) changes are shown in the table below: The “earned income amount” (line 1) is the amount of income (minimum limit) at or above which the maximum amount of the earned income credit (line 2) is allowed. The “threshold phaseout amount (lines 3 and 5 depending on filing status) and “completed phaseout amount” (lines 4 and 6 depending on filing status) are the adjusted gross income (AGI) ranges from where the EITC begins to phase out to where it reaches $0, or the income at or above which no credit is allowed. These ranges change depending on the filing status.

Example on figuring the EITC: Your AGI is $43,000, you are single, and you have two qualifying children. You cannot claim the EITC because your AGI is not less than the 2012 completed (maximum) phase out limit of $41,952. However, if your filing status was married filing jointly, you would be able to claim some of the EITC because your AGI is less than $47,162 complete phase out limit. You cannot get the fill EITC because your income is above the $22,300 threshold phase amount. Further examples and details are provided in the previous updates below.

2012 Earned Income (EITC) Tax Credit

2012 Earned Income Tax Credit

Note: The earned income tax credit is not allowed at all if the aggregate amount of certain investment income exceeds $3,200 for the given tax year.

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[Updated] As part of bush-era tax cuts extension legislation (Tax Relief, Unemployment Insurance Re-authorization, and Job Creation Act of 2010), a number of existing tax breaks were extended. One is the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC), which as discussed below, supplements the wages of low income workers, and especially working mothers, lifting more children out of poverty than any other single program or category of programs. The EITC will help 6.5 million working parents with 15 million children.

Under the 2008 Recovery Act, the EITC was expanded to reduce the marriage penalty and to create a “third tier” of the EITC for families with three or more children. This means larger families now receive up to $1,040 more than they would have under the old system. By extending the EITC the following benefits continue:

• About 6 million families will receive an expanded EITC tax credit. Without this agreement, these families could lose up to $1,040.

• About 1 million families headed by single mothers will receive an expanded EITC tax credit

The other tax break that was extended for two years was the Child Tax Credit (CTC), which is worth about $1,000 per eligible child, within the $3,000 refundability threshold. This extension will ensure an ongoing tax cut to 10.5 million lower income families with 18 million children.

The Child Tax Credit helps low-and moderate-income families with children. The credit allows families to reduce their federal income tax by a certain amount for each qualifying child under the age of 17 in a household. In the 2008 Recovery Act, the Administration and Congress secured an important expansion in the Child Tax Credit for lower income families by lowering the minimum amount from about $12,500 to $3,000.

For many of these families, extending the minimum threshold in the CTC will result in thousands of dollars in additional tax benefits that would have otherwise been lost. For example:

– A married couple with three children making $23,000 will receive $3,000 in child tax credits compared to about $1,540 if only the 2001/2003 tax cuts were extended – an increase of about $1,460.

– A single mother with two children making $17,000 will receive $2,000 in child tax credits compared to about $640 if only the 2001/2003 tax cuts were extended – an increase of about $1,360.

Earned Income Tax Credit EITC 2011-2012 levels

2011 EITC Income and Credit Phaseout Limits

Source : Whitehouse.gov

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One of the most claimed, but least understood and publicized is the Earned Income Credit (EIC) for low income earners. Thanks to Obama’s Economic Stimulus Package this credit has received a considerable bump for tax years 2009 and 2010 and many families may now qualify for this credit. The EIC is basically a tax credit for certain people who earn and income (hence the name of the credit) and have less than $48,279 of earned income. Because it is a tax credit it is money straight in your pocket (refund) or reduces the amount of tax you owe. The table below provides a summary of the qualification criteria for the credit:

earned income tax creditAs shown in the table, the amount of EITC and income thresholds increase in 2009 and 2010 for workers with a third qualifying child. Also, the definition of qualifying child has also changed in 2009, which is now:

·To be your qualifying child, a child must be younger than you unless the child is permanently and totally disabled.

·A child cannot be your qualifying child if he or she files a joint return, unless the return was filed only as a claim for refund.

·If the parents of a child can claim the child as a qualifying child but no parent so claims the child, no one else can claim the child as a qualifying child unless that person’s adjusted gross income (AGI) is higher than the highest AGI of any of the child’s parents who can claim the child.

Example of claiming the EIC: Your AGI is $35,550, you are single, and you have one qualifying child. You cannot claim the EIC because your AGI is not less than $35,463. However, if your filing status was married filing jointly, you might be able to claim the EIC because your AGI is less than $40,463.

Additional Criteria and Claiming the Earned Income Credit in your Tax Return

If you are eligible for the EIC based on the above criteria, you normally claim in your tax return. To claim the EIC credit you (and your spouse if filing a joint return) must also have a valid SSN issued by the Social Security Administration (SSA). Any qualifying child listed on Schedule EIC also must have a valid SSN. You can request an extension if you do not have your SSN. Other criteria you must meet to claim the EITC :

-Your investment income is $3,100 or less. If your investment income is more than $3,100, you cannot claim the credit.

-You Must Be a U.S. Citizen or Resident Alien All Year

-You must however have earned income through working during the year (hence the name of the credit). If you are married and file a joint return, you meet this rule if at least one spouse works and has earned income. If you are an employee, earned income includes all the taxable income you get from your employer. If you are self-employed or a statutory employee, you will figure your earned income on EIC Worksheet B in the instructions for Form 1040

-If you retired on disability, taxable benefits you receive under your employer’s disability retirement plan are considered earned income until you reach minimum retirement age

-If you and someone else have the same qualifying child but the other person cannot claim the EIC because he or she is not eligible or his or her earned income or AGI is too high, you may be able to treat the child as a qualifying child. But you cannot treat the child as a qualifying child to claim the EIC if the other person uses the child to claim any of the other six tax benefits listed earlier.

If you expect to qualify for the earned income credit in 2010, you may be able to receive part of it in each paycheck throughout the year from your employer (the maximum Advance EITC workers can receive from their employers is $1,830). For more information on the above, you can refer to the IRS Publication 596

Related:

~ 2009 vs. 2010 Federal Income Tax Brackets
~ 2009 Federal Income Tax Guide
~ How to Get a Free Copy of your IRS Tax Return
~ Stimulus Payments in 2010 & 2011

{ 214 comments… read them below or add one }

Shandi February 24

How much would I have to make to be able to claim my son?
I worked half a year but who filed my taxes said I did not make enough to claim him because I hadnt made enough money…

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Talia February 20

I made only a little over 2,000 and have 3 children how much can i get back?

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Kathy Babyak February 14

I am 74 and have a total with social security and pension of $1,620/month. I am also an amputee (below the knee). I receive a small amount of food stamps, I pay for my medicare. I have no income other than SS and my pension. Do you think I would be eligible for the earned income tax credit?

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Jen February 7

Is the EIC amount added to your original tax return amount? so lets say while doing my taxes it said i was getting 4,000 back and when you see if you qualify for EIC it says you qualify for 3,000 do that mean if they approve is the grand total will be 7000?? This is my first year really having a dependent so I am curious??/? Please help

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Andy (Author) February 8

Yes EIC is a tax credit – so you get back whatever your qualify for (based on income & dependents). Not tied to your other deductions or refunds. That’s what makes this such a popular credit.

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Billie Wilkerson February 3

I have four kids filed a 1099 due to self contract I only brought in 10,000 and they said. I am only getting 4900 back. This. Can’t be right filing three got me 9,000 back. I just. Don’t understand

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Beck February 3

Depending on your income. It needs to be at least around 14,000- 18,500 to get max amount back
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I know for my income matters
You have o be in the middle to get max
Examples of mine
2013 income was 11,000 yrly got 5,000 w 3 UN erarned income cred
2014 was 13,000 yrly income got 6k for 3 UN earned income cred.
2015 income was 14,050 yrly icome got 8,100 back
2016 income was 18,500 it’ll be 8,500 so to get about the max amount back it’s between 14,000-19,000 . Hop this helps.

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Leah January 31

Single mom as of last May, income of $5400 this year. What do I qualify for? Her dad only helped with child support for 2 1/2 months right after the divorce… I need to figure out everything I qualify for ahead of time as I’m trying to get us in our own place by the end of the school year & this would be our life saver!
Thanks!! :)

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Joan January 20

i am a single mother and made about 30,000 and have 2 children not sure if i would get full child tax credit for both?

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Kim February 25

Joan read the article ontop that says 2017,2016 and Past Earned Income Tax credit (EITC) Qualification and Income Thresholds by Andy (Author) He really gave a good breakdown based your income.

.EITC is not a 1 answer soln it is based on so many factors..that’s why I use Tax professionals like H&R block to figure everything out for me especially with this whole PATH situation going on this yr.. that way you can get the most out of it

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daniel January 20

single father I made about 30,000 this year have 1 child. would get full child tax credit not sure…

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Marla Anderson December 13

If I have a child who is 18 and still goes to school and he receives long term disability and I care for him can I claim his disability as earned income?

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Andy (Author) January 17

Yes, Per the IRS Earned income includes all the taxable income and wages you get from working or from certain disability payments. This includes Long-term disability benefits received prior to minimum retirement age.

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sam October 23

im 24 have one child born 10/13/14 an made about 8500 this year what would i be qualify for?

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Lisa February 2

Can I file my 2015 taxes? My files status is single my wages were $506 and I have no dependents.

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Andy (Author) February 15

Yes. The 2015-2016 tax filing season opened on Jan 19

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Theresa January 24

I am disabled also I have a son who is 22 and disabled. My husband was self employed and he made 10,212. Do we have to file? Will it affect my son’s and my ssi benefits? How much would we get back if we do have to file?

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Natasha December 3

I am a 24 year old single mom to my 2 year old. This year I have not worked so I earned $0 but I am attending school part time without fafsa. Do I qualify for anything?

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Ishmael Muhammad July 11

My name is Ishmael, and I only made 1,400 this year. I own no property, have no child and not filing head of house hold. And it’s showing that l’ m receiving only 42.00 dollars. Question: is there anything I could do legally to increase my tax return?

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daniel February 21

Hi I made 26000 and I’m head of house my wife dosent work and I have 2 month old baby do I get the full credit for my baby

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Stephen Twiggs February 14

I am a single father with 1 child and I am a college student, I made 1,290.00 in 2014, can I get the EITC?

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Andy (Author) February 14

Yes. You won’t get the max amount, but you will get a partial credit.

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Jennifer Sandelin February 10

How much would u get back for a 4 month old

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Andy (Author) February 10

Depends on your income – but see the above table for the maximum amounts.

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michelle February 9

I began filing my husbands taxes. His federal return will be close to 9000. 2000 of that is from the CTC four our 2 children. My husband owes some back child support. My question is….can child support take the $2000 CTC that is supposed to be for our children. Is there something we can do to make sure we at least get that from our return?

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Pam H February 12

Are you filing a joint return? If you fill out an injured spouse form you can still get your portion of the return, ctc and eitc

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Stephanie Webber January 7

Ask for hardship. Takes time but prove your going through hardship

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Darnel February 6

My sister had no income last year, has filed for disability but has not gotten it yet. Turbotax will not let her claim her dependent son, and it shows that she owes 500$ , how can this happen?

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liz January 27

if she had no income last year, why is she trying to file taxes?

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Maryann February 6

My daughter is 17 and still a full time student in high school this year. Why does my tax refund info state that I can not receive the standard deduction for her? I’ve paid just as much money on her and for her as previous years. I do not understand why this year is different. Can someone please explain it to me? I’d really appreciate any input. Thanks!

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karen February 12

Once they are 17 you can no longer get the child tax credit for them for them.

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Corissa February 4

I am a single mother of a two year old. Moved a couple times in 2014 and lived in a total of three states only working in one for a total of $206.15. What credits do I qualify for? I also have a baby on the way. When I attempted to get an estimate both on TurboTax and h&r block the refund that I would be getting back is approximately $77 with the only credit received is the eic. However when I contacted h&r block via phone the lady said I would qualify for the child tax credit as well. Was I misinformed? Just trying to make the most of my refund. From what I had been told by several people was to expect approximately $1000. I’ve been getting discouraged as I have not ever filed taxes before.

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Corissa February 4

Also adding I am 23 years of age.

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matt February 17

What I just read that means you need to better your life and stop whoring it up and not worry about what help you can get from the state I am a father of 2 and married . I am the only one that works and I make it. Get a job and stop asking for help.. I can’t help the helpless

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TEMERA January 8

are you serious? Did you really just contradict your self. You are married and have 2 children. What does your wife do all day? Please don’t take be a stay at home mother because I’ve worked, went to school, and supported 2 children on my own. Don’t judge someone you don’t know. All she asked was if what she has been told was correct or not. She didn’t ask for some uneducated, ill mannered, boy to give his personal opinion. And to top it off. You gave some lame @$$ opinion on a tax web site… I mean really how dumb can you possibly be? I don’t know if I feel more sorry for your wife or your kids. Your wife for actually looking at you and thinking gee he looks like husband/dad material. or your kids who really have no control over the life you give them and the ignorance you have shown here.

Nicole Johnson January 12

What part of anything that this young woman asked in this script above would make you come back with your opinion that she should better her life and then you include that she should stop whoring!! How dare you! Not once was she crying about her childrens father being a deadbeat or did she express any hardship or complain poor pitty me, she simply stated shes trying to make the most of her return and even though she had made a few moves thruout the year that does not define her as we do not know all the factors in her life. Obvisly your researching this same material most likley to do the same as this young lady! Very sloppy and stupid reaction on your part Matt because if you reread your very own words as you call a woman a whore you also state that your a father of two and married, that your the only one that works and your suggesting that Corissa needs to get a job! Now first you should be ashamed because your wife the one thats raising your two children dosent in fact have a job outside the home so in absoutley no way is she any different than the lady your calling a whore, and shame on you again because its a proven fact that a woman raising children as a stay at home mother put in 90 hours a week minumum!! Bet you feel a tad silly there Mr.Matt and can i ask for the record where you put in your hours and what dumbass employees your foul self? You cant be too important at all if you publicly speak to women like that and what kind of father are you? Stay close to your children and walk a new path, people like you are worthless and how dare you discourage or try to intimidate this young mother. Straight disgust for you and Ms.Corissa I hope you are blessed with a decent tax return, I commend you for taking care of your responsibilities and im sure your a wonderful mommy. I apoligize for this mans unnessecary vulgar comment and hopefully you have a better and blessed day, I will never understand or stand for lowlife humans who prey on hurting other people. Last thought is for you Matt, god forbid that one day you could have a lifechanging event occur in your immediate family and possibly a relative whos life hangs in the balance, your loved one may need a rare one in a billion SOMETHING….and the one person who may possibly save your loved ones life could be the woman/mother that you had nothing better to do than insult and call a whore. Take a lesson from this and i pray that you dont get slick out the mouth like this face to face with people because if you do seek god!! Where im from scum like you get dealt wit for way less and honey your day will come. You should be ashamed!!

casey carson January 15

agreed %100 with matt

Single Mother March 6

Don’t listen to Matt he is IGNORANT, and SELFISH. Doesn’t understand how hard real life is. I am also a single mother of a 6 year old and 25. I understand what you are going threw and it is hard to find the right information. I am too looking for where to go to fill taxes even tho this pass year I haven’t been able to work, and put down for a child care, which is more then what I made, even with a bite of help it’s still to much. Sometimes the best thing to do is to keep looking at different places. I’ve gone to two different location and was told I am unable to claim my son. One one said I could. Ask family and or friends who has done it, they could help you.

Matt for your information. Child Care where I am from cost $300 a week for 12 hours, which is two hours for four days and four hours for one day. Now if you multiply $300 by 4 it’s 1,200. Maybe that’s why you are the only working cause it’s only $1,200 a month for one child and $1,400 for two children. Even with help it would go down to $900 a month for one child and $1,100 for two children. Stop being closed minded and open your eyes to the reality and the truth of life.

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king fowley February 4

hi. i made $8500 total last year. i am single and withoutany children and rent my own house. i heard about an over 25 years of age $1000 low income thing i could be entitled to. could you please explain it to me some? thanks

kingsley

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Nina February 4

Hi I am trying to file online and my income was 7600.00 for the year and I have a 12 and 7 year old. I am technically married but have been separated for 6 years, for which 4 of those years he was incarcerated in a different state and he lives in a different state currently and hasn’t even seem the kids or myself for 6 years. I have a boyfriend and have lived with him for 4 years but I haven’t had the money to finish the divorce that I filed and I was unable to get my exes signature so they dismissed it in court and now I have to start over which I’m hoping to pay for with my refund. Anyway, my kids have lived with me full time and I want to know if I can file single, turbotax put that status in for me and I would get the eic, but I’m afraid I will get audited if I don’t file married filing seperate because my bf who lives with me is claiming our 3rd child we have together who is 3 years old and he’s claiming head of household. What should I claim? The difference in refund is so large I don’t want to claim married filing seperate but don’t know if I can claim head of household bc my bf is in the same household and I would think filing single is best but being technically married I would get an audit, is there a law saying anything about being seperate for so long would allow it? Ugh help me lol

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Nina February 4

I just wanted to add that my ex does not pay child support and I have court order for custody for my 12 and 7 year old as well.

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trisha February 3

I made 21000 this year, would I be eligible for child tax credit and the eic? I have 4 kids all under the age 10.

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kisha February 3

I owe state taxes of $1,460.00 dollars and have 2 children ages 13 yrs. and 15 yrs. and was to supposedly was to receive $7,100 back which would be my refund, would that eliminate me from getting the EIC or additional child tax credits?

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Bridget February 3

My son is 18 yrs old and he’s in the 12 grade. Would I get earn full income credit. What benifits would he be intiled too. He made 3440.

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Jessica February 3

Hi,
So on my W-2, the box that states Federal income tax withheld reads 1391.62. I am a single mother with one child and also filed as head of household. It did also mention the EITC as I was going through. Im concerned because my federal tax return states that Ill be getting upwards of 5,000 dollars. Is this even possible? Was there some error? Im afraid to get that money, and have them reclaim it later for an error I made.

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Jennifer February 6

There’s no error, you are entitled to the EIC and since they took out do much Federal Taxes, they owe you

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Dana L February 1

I am a single mom 8grand in unemployment ,2grand in work, a eight yr old son plus I went to school and have been paying on some school loans..do I qualify for Eric , head of house hold

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Andrea February 1

What if your single and filing for independent with no children and made an income of 28,000 at a age of 23 years old. Would you get money back if you made that much income and your only 23 years old?

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Sharon January 31

I am totally disabled and my 27 year old son takes care of me can he claim me as EIC ?

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Maria January 31

I am currently receiving food stamps… n i am legally married but we are not living together… Do i file my taxes as married jointly or do we have to do them separated since i only worked for 5 months last year. i dnt want to get into trouble with the food stamps office if i filed my taxes with the father of my children. He made 45,000 n i only made 4,000.

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Kyla January 31

My tax preparer just informed me I’ve been filing wrong. I have been receiving the EIC for years for my two children. My tax preparer just realized their father and I live together and he makes a little over 100 thousand and with that our children are no longer qualified for the credit even if we are not married, I file separate and I only make 22,000. Is this correct? 7 years I filed with EIC and this time I don’t because of this and I owe almost close to nothing but it was still a little depressing.

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danielle January 29

I have 2 children, 7 & 3 but i only made 4000$ last year. I was unemployed from jan to oct. And my boyfriend work and took care of us. My question is can he file head of household and claim my children? He made 24000 AIG… Will he still get the credits N EIC? Should I file single Or Should He Claim Me As A Dependent As Well? How Can We Get The Maximum Refund?

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amber January 29

I have 4 children outside my home who i owe back,pay and two who live with me i was also recently married if we file jointly and my husbands files to get his back will he get the EIC back for the two kids we have together? Or shoukd he file seperate with the kids on his?

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Andy (Author) January 29

If you are married and claiming the EIC you and your spouse have to submit a joint tax filing

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amber January 29

I owe back child supprt will they take the EIC AND HIS TAXES IF WE FILE TOGETHER THO?

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Pam H February 12

That sounds most likely correct, with the child tax credit and earned income tax tax credit, depending on if you made less than the maximum to qualify for eitc, I have one child, only made 12000 and got 5k back

Pam H February 12

Maybe filing injured spouse form? Dirty my other post was in response to another person.

kjt January 28

Hi,
I’m married (filing head of house hold) not legally separated but living separately for 2 years. I earned $24k for fy 2014 since I was laid off in May but I continue to use independent childcare since I was looking for employment, do I still qualify to use that deduction/credit even though I was collecting unemployment? For the reminder of the year (may- Dec).

Thank you,

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kjt January 28

Sorry, left out that I only have one child (3 years old)

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Andy (Author) January 28

Your salary would be classified as earned income so would allow you to claim the credit. Your employment compensation (insurance) is NOT earned income. So you could claim the credit , though you would not get the maximum amount since above the lower income threshold for 2014.

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Amanda January 27

Hi I made 200.00 over the cut off for the earned income credit with one qualifying child. Is there any way to get this being that it was not far over?

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Kathy January 26

We are on social security, we have income from pensions of 4500, and RMDs of 4100. Do we need to. File taxes.

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Andy (Author) January 26

You may not have (See IRS filing criteria here) since you had no earned income. But you may want to get any credits you are entitled to and potentially get a refund. And with most leading online software providers you should be able to file for free at your income level.

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kalena January 25

Hi I have one child that’s 12 if I claim her is there a certain amount I will get back because her age.

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Andy (Author) January 25

See the table in the post above to determine how much you get for 1 child, which will be correlated to your income.

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sandra January 25

Hi, I only worked for two months this year totaling maybe 3K ( i haven’t received my w-2 yet) but my husband worked and his is around 40K. We are filing married jointly, should i even wait for my w-2 or will it even make a difference for our return? we are getting a good amount back since we have 2 kids.

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Andy (Author) January 25

Definitely wait for to file your complete return. While it may not impact your taxes paid, it may impact your earned income credit and other tax breaks/deductions you are due. And mainly you do not want to file an amended return when you do get your W2. Because don’t forget a copy of your W2 also goes to the IRS and when they do an audit they will be able to see that your joint return did not include your earnings. I know this may mean you have to wait a bit to file, but it is a more prudent approach to file with all your docs and only have to do it once.

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Brandon cox January 24

Hi my name is Brandon me and my girlfriend have a 3 month old son born in September of 2014 I was wondering if I could claim him for eic considering he only lived in our home for 3 months out of the year but me and my girlfriend lived in the same home all year my income was 15,036 for 2014

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Andy (Author) January 25

You can since he was born in 2014. See this article from more information from the IS on claiming dependents. The only exception would be if someone else claims him as a dependents (e.g grandparents).

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Shell January 23

My 18 yr old son lived with me 2014. He worked grossing 600.00 for the yr. now can I claim him since he is filing his own taxes? If so do I need to put his income on my taxes?

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Andy (Author) January 23

See this article I wrote on claiming dependents. If he is filing and getting a tax return etc if may be hard for you to claim up. It depends on both your tax filing status’ otherwise the IRS may think you are double dipping!

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nicole January 23

I was on a one year exemption for public assistance. I only worked for four weeks of last year am i able to filed for myself and my son this year. I only made about 900 hundred dollars for last yearmaybe less.

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nancy January 23

Sorry I just asked a question but wrote it wrong lol
Question is made I over 9000 I 6 Months with unemployment and had taxes taken out. I think it was a little over 1000. I have 1 child. Will I still get a refund back ? Including any credits?

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Jhonna January 19

I’m 23, has a 2 month old. Born October 13th,2014. Made a little under 15,000. Wpuld I beableed to claim her or no?

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Andy (Author) January 23

You should be able to since born in the 2014 tax year

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Brittney Elliott January 18

I’m a single mother of 3 and only made 700 dollars this year working because of my last pregnancy. I did baby sit for 90 a week…..I don’t think I made enough to qualify for the child tax credit and I was wondering if there was some way of adding my babysitting earnings with my other wages and if that would even make a difference or is even possible. As of right now I’m only getting 348 dollars back and none for the child tax credit….any advice?

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Andy (Author) January 18

You can add the babysitting income to your tax return (as a sole proprietor) but then you would be liable for taxes (personal, employer and SS) on this income. So is a double edged sword. I would consider talking to a tax professional – look for advocates in your area that provide free advice – and see what options makes sense for you.

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Pam H February 12

What about household employee? Up to 1800/yr? Does this not help?

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Miriam January 17

Hi my name is Miriam my husband made about 32k and I did about 18k but we usually file married but file separately. And each claim a child. Do u think I can get a refund back.?? Or we should file together. That has always been my question but my tax person Always tells me to keep filing like that. Its that ok??

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Andy (Author) January 17

Why don’t you try completing a return both ways and see which gives you a better return? At your income levels you can use almost any leading tax software package to prepare (and most likely) file a return for free. No need to guess which filing status is best for you then.

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Sara January 17

Im a 36yr old single mother 2 children in school, i made 23, 000 . this year im filing head of house hold does that disqualify me from getting EIC because they said I made to much ?

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Kellee R. Smith January 14

Hi. I’m married with four children. We file an itemized long form for which my husband fild head of household. This year im thinking of filing married sep. and I claim kids. My hubby made 90 k andI 35k. What do you advise?

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Prakash January 13

We immigrated to the USA from India as resident aliens on 1st August 2014 and received our Green Card around 15th September 2014.

When filing our tax returns should we file for the entire year or only for the period from 1st August to 31st Dec 2014 or from 15th Sept to 31st Dec 2014 ??

Are we eligible for the Standard Deductions.

Please advise.

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kylah thomas January 8

I am 17 years old with a 1month old baby with no income or help can I file taxes for me and my child

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Andy (Author) January 8

Yes you can. In fact you may qualify for a whole host of credits (which means you get a refund even if you have no income). Try Turbo tax Free file (with whom I have an affiliation) to file for free since you have no income.

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Kevin ulmer January 8

im single father with 1 daughter she’s 1, i made 11,000 should still receive eic

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Andy (Author) January 8

you should if you are the one claiming her as a dependent. But if her mother is then you cannot.

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Amber January 6

Im 25, single mom of 2 year old son.. ive only worked sense may 27th 2014 and probably brought home about $4000 so far this whole time working..
What should I be getting back in taxes?

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Andy (Author) January 8

Hard to say as don’t know your other financial factors. I would just start free file with turbo tax or HR Block to get an estimate return/refund amount. Doesn’t cost you anything.

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Alexandria December 26

Hi I was wondering if I didn’t file taxes last year but I will file this year with a 21month old dependent would it be filed as two separate income years or one. Because I usually do hr block tax calculator (normally is off by only 20.00) however looking at the amount im supposed to receive it looks like garbage this year in previous years im used to receiving 5,000+ with one dependent.

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Andy (Author) December 27

You would have to file seperate tax returns for each year you are claiming or paying taxes. However you and your dependent could be filed on the same return for each year. Also I am not clear on your question, but if you didn’t file in 2014 (for 2013 taxes) you don’t have to file those again in 2015 (for 2014 taxes)

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jasmine December 18

Hi I’m a single mom of 4 kids and only made 4500 this year do you think I’ll be able to get the child credit?

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kalab freeman December 9

Hi i just got married this year and had a son my only child so far i have worked all year but i dont know how much i have made this year im just wondering if i could get an estimate from anybody of how much i will get back in taxes

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Patty Schuppenhauer December 7

When it comes to taxes I’m so confused I’m 23 single mother with two kids ages 2 and 4 I lost my job I work at for three years in February of this year and started collecting unemployment for six month and wasn’t able to collect any longer and I ended up having to withdrawal my 401k retirement because my bill and rent at the time were way past due I just started my new job November 29th so I was wondering if I’m even going to get much back at all

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Patty Schuppenhauer December 7

When it comes to taxes I’m so confused I’m 23 with two kids ages 2 and 4 I lost my job I work at for three years in February of this year and started collecting unemployment for six month and wasn’t able to collect any longer and I ended up having to withdrawal my 401k retirement because my bill and rent at the time were way past due I just started my new job November 29th so I was wondering if I’m even going to get much back at all

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Patty Schuppenhauer December 7

Also I forgot to add I am a single mother if that counts for anything

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Danielle November 29

I’m 23 years old and through out my teens I always kept a job but never was there for a year (only couple of months) never file taxes my mother aways did but this will be her last year able to file for me because I refuse to let her she never gives me money so worked this year pizza hut and dunkin donuts but as of right now not working. Can I still file for taxes? Also I’m full time student and my mother haven’t taken care of me in 2 years so that don’t give her no right to file for me? Help of please

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Quanasia November 23

Would there be something else I can use to still claim my kids

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Quanasia November 23

I am 20 yrs old I have a child that’s 2 yrs old and a child that’s 11 months old I made 8,000 this year will I be able to get full tax credits for my kids?

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Andy (Author) November 23

No you would not qualify for the credit. You would need to have $13,650 in 2014 AGI (adjusted gross income) to claim the credit.

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Bobbie sue January 21

Yes you can ! Go to efile free or h&r not sure if you would have much fee .

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Bobbie sue January 21

But you should get a good amount .

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Bobbie sue January 22

Sorry I’m wrong !

Celi November 8

I’m a single mother with one six year old boy.. my total gross income is at $10,100. Do I still qualify?

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Andy (Author) November 9

Yes…you would almost be eligible to get the full credit.

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carrie October 25

My question is I am on long term disability I make 11000 my kids each , 2 of them 1 Dev delayed ages 1 n 4, get 11000 apiece yearly as well off my disability 26000 all together! Do I quuailify for anything? Thank you very much!

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Kassandra November 24

I am 29 and have a son that is 6yrs old and I worked half of the year and made on my total tax returned 1,734.00 and I am getting unemployment now but I don’t think it has taxes taking out will I get the credit this year? Last year I got it and my total tax was 2,989.00 with one son. Last year it helped me a lot getting that credit.

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Andy (Author) December 19

Yes it looks like you may not have earned enough in 2013 to claim the credit based on the tables above. But there are a lot of other credits (Child care, low income credits) that you may be eligible for.

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Glenn August 14

I am age 62 and a care-giver for an older 100% disabled sister. I have always been able to claim the
EIC because I provide more than 50% of her annual support. With this years changes in EIC I don’t know that I still qualify. For 2013 I will be claiming Single, Head of House with 1 dependent on a salary of approx. 13,972.00. What is the salary cap for me for 2013? Do I still qualify for EIC?

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Andy (Author) December 19

Looks like you will qualify based on the tables in the post. You should qualify for the full credit if you meet all the eligibility rules.

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brian March 3

Hello, i am married filing jointly with two children and made $31,000 for 2012 combined income for my wife and I. My question is, will we receive the eic as well as the child credit of $1,000 per child? Or is the child credit included in the eic? Thank in advancr for any help.

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chris March 6

You will receive $1000 per child for CTC which equals $2000 and $4219 EITC for both kids. $6219 total in credits plus whatever tax refund that was withheld.

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dane March 1

Im on ssi, and earned income is$ 3,600 , and have to children, what would i qualify for???

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reyna February 19

I made around $19,000 this tax year for 2012 and claimed 1 child who just turned 17 on sept wht will be my refund. Cuz i was told that i will lose $1000 cuz of my dependents age.

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June February 18

My name is June. Im a single mom of 2 kids. I only made $12, 600 this year. How much would I get for 2 kid each? I always go to hr block but they charge me $400
Thankyou

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Andy (Author) February 19

You should get the full amount for 2 kids – $5236 if you meet all the other eligibility criteria outlined in the article above.

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Pam February 12

I am a single mother of two children; ages 12 and 14. I only made around $700 this past yr due to being ill. I am not sure if I could claim the EITC but shouldnt I be able to get the child tax credit. We had someone do the filing process for us and says I will only get $304 period from anything. Is that correct or is something missing somewhere? Please help!

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Jill February 13

u should of def. got the way more for child tax credits would definitely have someone elso professional look into it

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david February 12

i have 3 kids with my wife and made 10000 last yr i am wondering if i own back child support for another kids i had before my wife and i had our 3, will child support take this credit from us, and even though my wife made less than me will injured spouse prevent child support from taking it all? they already take half of my paycheck.

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Lisa February 23

you can call this IRS number for liens, im not sure what it is, you can look it up. It will tell if your taxes will be messed with.

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Courtney February 11

Can I still get that EITC and claim my 1 yr old son if I only earned 2,600 for 2012? I really need the money.This is the first year that I have made under 19,000 and I hope there is SOMETHING I can do.

Thanks!
Courtney

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Andy February 11

You probably won’t qualify for the full EITC based on your income. But you should be able to get some amount since you had earned income. You may also qualify for the $1,000 Child tax credit. This is also outlined in the article above.

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Harry Cooper February 9

My daughter is 18. She lives on her own. She has a babygirl a little over 1 yr old. She recently lost her job due to layoffs. Unfortunately, she said she hasn’t even worked six months there. She is a college student as well. She lives in gov’t housing and recently applied for food stamps to survive. Can she get EITC even though there is a earnings minimum she must meet, or is CTC her only option?

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Andy February 11

Unfortunately she probably won’t qualify for the EITC based on her income. However she should qualify for the $1,000 Child tax credit discussed in the article. She may also be able to get food stamp and other low income assistance.

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DeQwan February 6

I am a 19 year old no kids student and employed made 25,000 in 2012. I take care of my disabled mom can I carry her on my taxes

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Andy February 11
Mary February 5

I made 2600 for 2012 and have one child (11 months old) would I be able to claim eic?
My husband and I are married culturally but havient gotten our marriage certificate.. So we can’t file jointly. Maybe we will get a better return? He made 28630 for 2012 maybe he can claim eic and our child? Can he claim me as an adult living in the house?

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Andy (Author) February 6

From what you described, your husband would qualify for the EIC (your income is too low if filing separately). He can claim your child as a dependent. He may also be able to claim you are as a qualifying relative because you are a member of this household. See more about eligibility for claiming you in this article – http://www.savingtoinvest.com/2013/01/who-can-i-claim-as-a-dependent-for-exemptions-tax-credits-and-head-of-household-status.html

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betty February 4

I am a single mother of one son. For over a year I have worked and lived in a mobile home park, I cleaned homes and did maintance work. I earned $150 per week, and my rent was included in my pay ($500 a month) It comes out to a little over $13,000. I am considered self employed. What do I need to have to file my taxes? I have weekly invoices for my work (the $150 per week). Can I also claim the $500 per month on rent that I work off? I alway’s had a w-2 with my other jobs…I’m just confused on how to go about filing my taxes as self emloyed. Thank you in advance for your help!

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Lacey February 3

I just had a baby in the middle of December 2012, does this child qualify for eic or ctc, considering he only lived with me the last 2 weeks of 2012, or would they count my pregnancy as residency for him? I made 10,500 for 2012 to, what would my refund be if he qualifies?

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Andy February 4

You will qualify for the credit. According to the IRS (publication 596) a child who was born in 2012 is treated as having lived with you for more than half of 2012 if your home was the child’s home for more than half the time he or she was alive in 2012. Based on your income you should you qualify for the full credit ($3,169)

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Jessica January 31

My name is Jessica (22) and I am married and my income was 13,334.47 and my husband (24) made 18,803.50 and we have a 6 month old and I was wondering if we should file together or seperately and whether or not we will get the child tax credit for my son.

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Andy (Author) January 31

For 2012, the child tax credit starts phasing out (reducing) for those above a specified modified adjusted gross income (MAGI). For married taxpayers filing a joint return, the phase-out begins at $110,000. For married taxpayers filing a separate return, it begins at $55,000.

So I think you are good in either case, since you combined and/or individual return is below the threshold. I am not sure about your other financial details but you may also qualify for the EITC described above.

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Cori lynn January 31

I am a single mother of 2, 11yr old and 13yr old. I made 2025.00 on my w2 for 2012. I also worked cleaning a few houses on and off. I do not have a w2 for cleaning though. First, would I qualify for eitc and how much would that be? And second, how much would I receive for the child tax credit? I did pay for childcare while I worked. The lady that picked my kids up from school and watched them until I got off has moved out of Texas and I do not have ss# or the other number I need in order to claim child care. I would appreciate any help, thank you for your time!

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Andy February 4

Cori – The problem you have is that your official (W2) income is lower than the EITC qualifying threshold of $13,090 for someone with 2 children. So you would not qualify for the EITC. You would need to get a formal W2 (and pay taxes) for your othe income and/or to claim other deductions like dependent care etc.

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mr d February 6

you did not earn enough for eitc, you can get back $1000 per child for tax credit if you are lucky.

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Jessy January 30

Andy, I’m a single parent with a 1 year old daughter, I made roughly $11,000 in 2012. Would I be eligible to claim my daughter with that low of income? If so, would I only be getting the $1000 for her or would I be eligible for more? I’ve had to pay for daycare / babysitting for this whole year as well. Thanks for any info you might have!

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Heather Moser January 30

Jessy, my income was almost exactly the same as yours this year, and for me & my sin, my refund is$ 4,600.You’ll get the child tax credit, the earned income credit, and probably another credit forcare of if a dependent child.Hope this helps! :)

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Jeremy Williams January 29

Hello,

This year I have been the sole provider for, a women and a child. The women is 20, the child is 3. Why am I not entitled to EIC, even though I’m not a blood relative I’ve more then paid my share just as if I was the father.

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Andy January 30

You may be entitled if you can claim them as dependents or file as head of household. It all depends on your earned income for the year.

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Leah January 29

I have a daughter age 5 and this year I made around 4000. I did claim my unemployment for the remainder of the year but did not have taxes with held from the unemployment. I did attend courses for CNA classes and did in fact pass and earned my certificate. I’m curious as to if I will get earned income for my child and appox. How much I will earn back all together. I’m certain it won’t be much but I’m curious before I go into H&R and they charge me some $200 to do my taxes. I will be filing as head of household. Her father did pay some child support with a total of around $800. Also do I get some type of college credit? Back in 2011 the man that was doing my taxes meantioned a college credit. My college was funded by the WorkForce of an amount of $1400 but I paid expences to make sure I travel to complete my courses.

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Andy January 30

You should be able to use online tax software to get an estimte of your credits/deductions without having to pay a fee. (see this article for more http://www.savingtoinvest.com/2011/01/the-best-tax-software-and-free-filing-options-as-tax-filing-goes-primarily-online.html)

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Lisa January 29

I made about 26,000 and a single mom of a 16yr old and 11 yr roughly how much will I get

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Andy January 30

You should get a partial credit (about $2,000 is my guess). But to get a more accurate number check out the IRS EITC tool or use any good tax software (see recommended providers – http://www.savingtoinvest.com/2011/01/the-best-tax-software-and-free-filing-options-as-tax-filing-goes-primarily-online.html)

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pricsilla January 29

I am a single mother with one child (1yr) and had not worked in 2012. although my boyfriend has worked and has an income of 41479.80. will he be able to claim my daughter?

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Andy January 30

If you file a joint return and your boyfriend can claim your child as a dependent you should be able to partially claim the credit.

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Brandy January 28

Im a single parent. My daughter is 15. My income was around $4300. Do I qualify?

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Kitty77 January 28

Unfortunately, you do not qualify for this credit. Your income needs to meet the tax bracket of $10,000 – $17,000 as stated above.

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Andy January 30

Your income is too low to qualify for the EITC. But you may be able to get other benefits like the child credit and other lower income tax breaks.

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Glenn February 15

Kitty77 and Andy, you seemed to miss the fact that the EIC tables go down to $1 and goes up. Brandy is eligible for partial EIC based on her income.

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karla January 26

Hello i have 2 children and have been unemployed receiving unemployment since june will that affect my refund i did work up until mid may someone please respond

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Kitty77 January 29

If you received more than $4000 in unemployment and it was taxable, then you may still qualify for the EIC, depending on your income you did earn up until you started receiving unemployment.

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karen January 25

we made 26000 THIS YEAR MY SHARE WAS SSI. WE HAVE I CHILD 13 WOULD WE QUALIF FOR ANYTTHING. THANKS

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Andy January 30

To qualify for the EITC you must have earned income, which is:
•Wages, salaries, tips, and other taxable employee pay;
•Union strike benefits;
•Long-term disability benefits received prior to minimum retirement age;
•Net earnings from self-employment

Examples of Income that are Not Earned Income:
– Pay received for work while an inmate in a penal institution
– Interest and dividends
– Retirement income
– Social security
– Unemployment benefits,
– Alimony
– Child support.

SSI would NOT be classifed as earned income so you would not be eligible for the credit. But if your spouse does have earned income you may.

Disclaimer: All guidance provided is informational based on the limited information provided.

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Andy (Author) January 25

Here are the top five things the IRS wants you to know about this credit.

1. The EITC not only reduces the federal tax you owe, but could result in a refund. You base the amount of EITC on your earned income and the number of qualifying children in your household. The average credit was around $2,200 last year. If you qualify, the credit could be worth up to $5,891.

2. If your financial, marital or parental situations change from year to year, you should review the EITC eligibility rules. Just because you didn’t qualify last year doesn’t mean you won’t this year.

3. If you are eligible for the EITC, you must file a federal income tax return to claim the credit – even if you are not otherwise required to file. If you use IRS e-file to prepare and file your tax return, the software will guide you and not let you forget this important step. E-file does the work and figures your EITC for you!

4. You should understand the qualifications for EITC before claiming it, including:
– You do not qualify for EITC if your tax filing status is Married Filing Separately.
– You must have a valid Social Security number for yourself, your spouse – if filing a joint tax return – and any qualifying child listed on Schedule EIC.
– You must have earned income. You have earned income if you are paid wages, you are self-employed, you have income from farming or you receive disability income.
– Married couples and single people without children may qualify. If you do not have qualifying children, you must also meet age and residency requirements as well as dependency rules.

Special rules apply to members of the U.S. Armed Forces in combat zones. Members of the military can elect to include their nontaxable combat pay as earned income for the purpose of computing the EITC. Even if you make this choice, your combat pay will remain nontaxable.

5. Use the EITC Assistant. It’s easy to determine if you qualify. The EITC Assistant, a helpful tool available on IRS.gov, removes the guesswork from eligibility rules. Just answer a few simple questions to find out if you qualify and to estimate the amount of your EITC.

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Ellaine January 24

Married filing jointly. Our AGI is 46,000 and we have 2 kids, how much is our refund?

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sherrelle January 23

Married filing joint we made 62000. We have 2 kids. Will we get sic or child tax credit?

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Andy (Author) January 23

You could technically qualify for both EIC and CTC. At your income level though it looks like you would only qualify for the CTC (which is about $2,000 for 2 kids)

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teresa January 23

I live in sc and my daughter is attending school in ky. She turned 24 in oct 2012. Can i file her for earned
income credit? What about tax credit

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JW February 3

It would great to get an answer to this question, there are several of us in the same position.

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Andy February 4

Teresa – You can claim her as a dependent which may quality you for both the EITC and CTC. It will depend on your earned income etc (which I don’t have details on).

The time attending school may count as a temporary absence(so won’t disqualify you from the residency requirement for EITC) but you must prove that your son’s primary residence was still your home. According to the IRS, to qualify as a student, your child must be, during some part of each of any 5 calendar months during the calendar year:
1. A full-time student at a school that has a regular teaching staff, course of study, and regular student body at the school, or
2. A student taking a full-time, on-farm training course given by a school described in (1), or a state, county, or local government.
The 5 calendar months need not be consecutive. A full-time student is a student who is enrolled for the number of hours or courses the school considers to be full-time attendance

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smithbrenda January 21

My husband an i are seniors an draw our ssi i made 11700.49 in 2012 as a waitress.Do we get earned income as well as what i pd in?Also do we have to file our ssi?

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Brittany January 21

I am 26 and live with the father of my 2 children. I am on disability so I can not work and he is an independent contractor. He made 12,000 this year. 1) can he claim me if he takes care of me? and 2) how much would we get back if he claimed all 3 of us?

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Ivey January 21

My son is 22. He lives with me except for when school is in session. He was a full time college student in 2012 and graduated Dec 15th. Is he still considered to meet the qualification of a full time student at the end of 2012 for purposes of my claiming the earned income credit?

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Andy (Author) January 21

To claim the EITC, you must meet all of the following tests: Relationship, Age, Residency and Joint Return. I think you are good on all except for one – residency test – : “Your son must have lived with you, or your spouse if you file a joint return for more than half of the year.”

The time attending school may count as a temporary absence(so won’t disqualify you from the residency requirement) but you must prove that your son’s primary residence was still your home. I look up the IRS website for the 2012 EITC requirements and found the following for students:

To qualify as a student, your child must be, during some part of each of any 5 calendar months during the calendar year:
1. A full-time student at a school that has a regular teaching staff, course of study, and regular student body at the school, or
2. A student taking a full-time, on-farm training course given by a school described in (1), or a state, county, or local government.
The 5 calendar months need not be consecutive. A full-time student is a student who is enrolled for the number of hours or courses the school considers to be full-time attendance

I don’t have this information from your comment so you will need to assess this and make a determination.

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Summer January 21

Hi, I am on Disability so I cannot work very often do to a rare spinal disease, maybe 1 or 2 hours per week if possible. I earned a total of $1,026.50 on my W-2 form. I have 2 questions? My first question is how much will I recieve on my EITC? My second question is do I qualify for the CTC?Thanks

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Andy (Author) January 21

To get the CTC (child tax credit), you need children. Do you have any? Per the tables in the article the maximum EITC amount in 2012 for someone without no qualifying children is $487.

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Cris January 18

My son turned 17 in November will I still be eligible for earned income credit for him my income is about 22,000

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Andy January 18

You should be able to since your income is within the threshold for a single child (17K – 37K). Also your child’s age is not what makes him a qualifying child. The IRS definition is shown below, which I think your child meets.

·To be your qualifying child, a child must be younger than you unless the child is permanently and totally disabled.

·A child cannot be your qualifying child if he or she files a joint return, unless the return was filed only as a claim for refund.

·If the parents of a child can claim the child as a qualifying child but no parent so claims the child, no one else can claim the child as a qualifying child unless that person’s adjusted gross income (AGI) is higher than the highest AGI of any of the child’s parents who can claim the child.

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Lloyd Licht January 10

I was unemployed for most of 2012, working only 10 weeks with a total income of approx. $5000. My wife has cancer so is unable to work and I have 5 children (all under 17 and in school).

Would I qualify for the EIT and/or CTC?

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Holli January 18

Yes, you would qualify. As long and you have an income, that is below the IRS guidelines, which you do, you qualify. However, with this said you can only actually claim 3 children. I have the similar circumstances and I qualify for about the max EIC.

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melinda January 22

Did you received unemployment? That may effect the amount of EIC you qualify for

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dee ondrey January 3

I am a single mother My daughter is 17 & in the 3rd year of high school.what will I qualify fo this year I made 10,000.

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Andy (Author) January 6

Based on the information you provided, you should.

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Donnie January 17

You should get:

EIC: $3,169
CTC: $1,000

Total refund: $4,169 + Federal Taxes withheld… Also, The majority of State tax withheld…

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Missy January 2

My son turned 17 in October will I still be able to claim him and receive EIC?

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Andy (Author) January 6

According to the IRS and above criteria, Your child is a qualifying child if he/she is related to you and must be younger than you (unless the child is permanently and totally disabled). So the 17 yr age should not be an issue assuming you are below the income thresholds to claim the credit.

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Amy January 1

I need to find out if a person filed for the Earned Income Tax Credit on my 3 children without my knowledge or consent. What happens if I file for the EITC for my children and this other person files the same for my children at the same time?

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Amanda King December 26

I usually receive a large amount for my 3 kids every year and my income is usually around 12,000 and this year it was only 3500 because i couldn’t work because i was pregnant and my income return went from 8000 to 1600….y is that??

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Pam January 3

If you have 3 kids and only 12,000 in one year, something should have gone off in your head that said “DON’T GET PREGNANT”. Poor children.

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angie January 6

if its not u or ur kids u shouldnt reply im disabled raising my 4 kids n my grand babies on my $16,000 a year i pay ALL my bills all i get is medicaid for me n my son n grand kids n i pay insurance for the rest u CAN do it u DON”T have to b rich or make A LOT of MONEY to BE HAPPY this is a TAX site PAM and AMANDA KING the less u make the less u get from the EITC u ned to go online or to the library and get a book and ;ook at ur EITC amount for 3200 sorry for the BAD comments made bout u i know how it is i hate being disabled i REALLY wished i could work DON’T pay it any attention also try to get ur taxes done free its gets u back MORE money i can help tell u bout more places n this site can too my oldest kids r in college on scholarships cause of GREAT grades n my youngest is also an honor student so being poor ain’t so bad!!!! it’s working for my family and they DON”T do without

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Donnie January 17

Wrong, The more you make over the threshold, the less you get!!! as long as you make under the phaseout point, you get the max credit, once you cross over that threshold they start deducting to make up the difference between what you earned and what you would have gotten had you not earned what you did for the year… if you happen to make over the max phase out… you get nothing, and are ineligible for EIC!!! I am experienced in Taxes and Credits, as I have taken classes and continue to every tax year as the new and revised qualifications change…

Michelle January 7

The same way you should have the common sense not to be a judgemental cunt. Oh, wait.

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Holli January 18

Wow, poor children— what a person you must be. Obviously caring for children or being around people is not one of your priorities. I have 5 children and only made 10 grand last year, my husband was laid off work the entire year and guess what MY POOR children were paid for, bathed, feed, houses, loved and thoroughly taken care of. Unless you can walk on water, heal the sick, raise the dead, forgive my sins, and die for me, then feel free to judge away! If not, shut up.
Freedom of speech DOES NOT mean the right to stupidity and inhumanity!

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Sheila February 1

If you were reading her post then something should have gone off in your head that said “mind your own fucken business”.

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Roulette September 27

How much is a child under 1 worth when claiming on taxes???

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gail December 17

Up to $3,094 is the credit value for 1 child assuming you are below the earned income threshold outlined in the table within the article.

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Brittney September 6

I made less than 4000 for the year and have a newborn do I qualify for eic still?

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gail December 17

Yes…as along as you meet other criteria for the qualifying child outlined in the article.

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Earned Income Credit August 20

Looks like $36,920 for 2012 (EITC)
You still need to talk to an tax expert.
Ask them do you get the full amount if you income is under the $36920.

Also, the Child Tax Credit is $35,052 (CTC)

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becky February 18

I have a child in febuary of 2011 turned 17 so i dont qualify for eitc???

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melinda January 22

they don’t qualify for CTC they still qualify for EIC if they lived with you more than 6 months of the year

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Janet Johnson February 2

My average tax return is usually around $8,000. I file head of household with 3 children. My income for 2011 is $19383.00 and when I entered all my information for my 2011 taxes, my return says that I am only going to get around $2600 back this year. I don’t understand why I am not getting the earned income credit and child tax credit amounts like I have in the previous years.

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andys2i February 4

Janet – You should be qualified for the credit. Not sure what your other financials and filing situation are like, but here are some notes from the IRS that could impact your EITC eligibility.

– You do not qualify for EITC if your filing status is Married Filing Separately.
– You must have a valid Social Security number for yourself, your spouse – if filing a joint return – and any qualifying child listed on Schedule EIC.
– You must have earned income. You have earned income if you work for someone who pays you wages, you are self-employed, you have income from farming, or – in some cases – you receive disability income.
– Members of the military can elect to include their nontaxable combat pay in earned income for the EITC. If you make this election, the combat pay remains nontaxable.

You should also look into the EITC Assistant, an interactive tool available on the IRS website. If you are preparing your taxes electronically, the software will figure the credit for you. See applicable tools here : http://www.savingtoinvest.com/taxes

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Ben January 28

The 2011 tax year was the first year I have ever made wages my family could live on without any extra assistance (around $65,000 gross). I have one daughter, a wife, a load of bills (none of them consumer debt), and around $600 per month in student loans payments. Is there any relief from the tax code for someone like me that is trying to live frugally but is paying an exorbitant amount of money to both the Department of Education and Sallie Mae for my college as well as my wife’s student loans? I am the sole wage earner, so this is a hefty burden (actually it is higher than our rent!)

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NutterIRA January 27

The Internal Revenue Service and community partners nationwide today launched their annual outreach campaign aimed at helping millions of Americans who earned $49,078 or less take advantage of the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC).

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brandy January 5

is there a minimum amount you have to make in a year to qualify for child tax credit?

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andys2i January 6

The “earned income amount” (line 1) in the table of the article is the minimum earnings required to claim the EITC.

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andrea January 3

I’m 17 years old, I don’t have a job, and I’m graduating this year in may from highschool. I haven’t lived with my mother since I was 16. I have lived with my older sister who is 28, for right under a year. she also has 3 children; 9, 6, and 4. her fiance, my brother in law was wondering if he could claim me even though I’m not blood related to HIM. I have read on H&R Block that he can claim me if I’ve lived in his household & he provides for me all year. but I’ve also read that he can’t claim me at all if were not blood related. if somebody could clarify me what he can or can’t do on his taxes tht involve me, it would be great! please & thank youu!

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sharron January 6

Yes, he can carry you on his return. Go to IRS.gov for more information on Qualifying Relative
There are four tests that must be met for a person to be your qualifying relative. The four tests are:

Not a qualifying child test,

Member of household or relationship test,

Gross income test, and

Support test.

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andrea January 6

thank you so much! I will definitely go to that website and look at all of it.

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joe December 29

In 2011 what is the tax bracket for EIC for two children

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joe December 29

I see 2009 & 2010 but nothing on 2011. Is it the same or higher?

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andys2i January 5

The top tables contain 2011 and 2012 data. There were slight increases.

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sharon moore March 6

I am working on my own doing housekeeping. I am 69 yrs old. Do i have to pay federal and state taxes to qualify for the earned income credit? If yes how do I do it? I make around $640.00 a month but it varies, not more but less. How about sec. sec. and medicare taxes?

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sharron January 6

No, you dont have pay FED and State taxes to qualify for the EIC. But you will have to pay self employment taxes for Social Security and Medicare. You could also owe taxes for FED and State (if you live in a taxable state) for the money you earned.

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Gerald Logie February 1

I have a stepdaughter who turned 25 in November of 2010. Am I still allowed to recieve EIC
for her in this years taxes?

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Norretha January 7

I am just confused about the whole tax thing can someone please explain to me because everything so crazy.

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jenjen April 11

Wow, if the entire tax thing is bewildering to you perhaps you could self educate by google.com asking specific questions.
You can also go to a search on your states taxes and just read, read, read. . .
When in doubt. . . ask more questions.

1st. If you do any type of work that you get paid for you must file taxes.
2. If you honestly know nothing about taxes, have a professional do them for you.
3. There is often a charge for someone to do your taxes for you. Ask people in your local community who they recommend.
4. Good luck!

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MICHELLE MEDINA January 4

I HAVE 3 CHILDREN 11, 12, AND 20. I KNOW THAT I CAN CLAIM EITC FOR MY 11 AND 12 YR OLD BUT WHAT ABOUT MY 20 YR OLD. SHE LIVES WITH ME GOES TO COLLEGE I SUPPORT HER, SHE DOES NOT HAVE A JOB. I KNOW THAT I CAN CLAIM HER ON MY TAXES, BUT WHAT ABOUT THE EITC CREDIT OR CAN I CLAIM HER ON SOMETHING ELSE AND STILL RECEIVE SOME MONEY FOR HER? THANK YOU

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Antionette Randall November 21

You will be allowed to claim the EIT for you college student for this and the next tax season. As long as she is in school. You also may be eligible for the American Tax Opportunity if you have out of pocket expenses towards her tution. You have a choice to either take that money to lower your AGI under section 2 of the 1040 form titled education/tution or take the tax credit.

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maegen October 23

How much money do you have to earn to qualify for the eic?

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Tax Professional December 9

Maegen, Read the above article….It depends on your specific situation..

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melinda January 22

You DO NOT get the maximum EIC at all income levels below the phaseout point. It is a curve that goes up and down.

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